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Architecture

Trione Vineyards - The Old Stone Building

Digital Archive, Source: Trione Vineyard Website
The Old Stone Building
During planning and construction of their new winery at the Trione’s Alexander Valley Home Ranch, three generations of the family gave thoughtful consideration to preserving the 97-year-old landmark stone building. Built in 1908 as Nervo winery, the commanding structure reveals Sonoma County’s winemaking history rooted in Italian American traditions. The Old Stone BuildingFrank Nervo Sr. commissioned the winery two years after the San Francisco earthquake devastated homes and commercial structures as far north as Santa Rosa and Alexander Valley. Nervo hired contractor and stone mason Peter Moroni, whose family immigrated to California from Italian villages near the Carrara quarry where Michaelangelo acquired his marble. Moroni used large basalt blocks mined from nearby Annadel quarry and lumber cut and hewn from Oregon forests. Mindful of the recent quake and the power of Mother Nature, Moroni developed a unique, reinforced design. As the building began to rise and the massive second floor joists were hoisted into place, he embedded a heavy linked chain into the outside walls. Nervo installed contemporary winemaking equipment. A 30-horsepower locomotive-size steam boiler ran the must pump and wine press; a donkey engine powered various sized steel wheels driving leather belts to feed grapes to the crusher. Second floor fermenters gravity-fed ground floor storage tanks secured on a concrete floor, an innovation at a time when dirt floors were common. Newspaper accounts from 1908 laud the newly built structure as a symbol of the vitality and conviction pioneering families had for the future of Sonoma County agriculture and wine. After a century of use, the Old Stone Building retains that original belief and foresight. Now a beautifully restored two-story hospitality center surrounded by sweeping views of Alexander Valley, the Old Stone Building accommodates the winery’s special events and Trione wine club gatherings. Enhanced by a beautifully planted courtyard with cascading water fountain, it is open for arranged tours that provide historical perspective and ample room for personal inspiration. The venue is also available for weddings and gatherings up to 250 people. - See more at: http://trionewinery.com

Historic Old Courthouse Square building for sale

Empire Building - Photo © Sean Bressie

Change is coming to the historic, clock-capped Empire Building on Santa Rosa's Old Courthouse Square. It is up for sale and its primary tenant — … ...read more Source:: PressDemo – Local News

Lest We Forget – Brainerd Jones

Although a photograph of Brainerd Jones hangs on the wall of the Petaluma Historical Museum and Library I wonder how many current Petaluma residents know about the impact he had on architecture of the schools, churches, businesses, public buildings, as well as homes in our town? As stated in his obituary in the Argus-Courier (March 21, 1945), “Architecture was his life and today a large group of buildings in this city rise as monuments to his artistry and skill.” Among the most notable structures he designed in Petaluma over a five decade career are:

Brainerd Jones

  The Carnegie Library (Now the Historical Museum) 1904-1906. The former Lincoln Primary School, School Administration building, 11 Fifth Avenue The former Post Office Building, 22-34 Petaluma Boulevard (1926). The Petaluma Woman's Club, 518 “B” Street An addition to the Sunset Line and Twine building (1906 & 1922). The remodel of the old Opera House, 147-149 Kentucky Street The original art Deco-style Fire Station on “D” Street (1938). The Must Hatch Incubator building, 401 7th Street The 1922 Petaluma Golf & Country Club Clubhouse The First Congregational Church, Fifth & “B” Streets Former Philip Sweed School, 331 Keller Street Jones's home-office, 226 Washington Street The Byce House (used for filming of Peggy Sue Got Married), 226 Liberty Street Residences at: 319 Keokuk Street, 300 Kentucky Street, 500 Western Avenue, and 625, 901, 910, 920 “D” Street.   Jones was born in Chicago, Illinois and moved to Petaluma with his recently widowed mother, when he was six years old. He won drawing contests at local fairs, as a young man. After his studies and work as an architect in San Francisco, he returned to Petaluma and became a very active member of the community: Petaluma Rotary Club, Petaluma B.P.O.E. Lodge #901, City Council member, and the City Panning Commission. It has been estimated that approximately 75% of the buildings in Petaluma's historic core were designed by Jones, although many are no linger there, now. Local researchers have found it difficult to find much about Jones' personal history. Katie Watts, has written for the Argus-Courier that, “It's almost as though he planned it that way – allowing his work to speak so magnificently about who he was.” Lest we forget. Resources: Research files: Petaluma Historical Library & Museum History Room, Sonoma County Library, Petaluma Katherine Rinehardt, Petaluma: A Histoiry of Architecture, 2005. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brainerd_Jones http://www.sonic.net/~tdn/jones.html Source: Petaluma - Our River Town

LeBaron: Fountaingrove's forgotten winery disappearing into history

Fountaingrove WinerySean Bressie | Sonoma County Historical Society

Fountaingrove Winery from the air - c1930s

  There's been a lot of talk around town lately about historic buildings. St. Rose Church, the Cannery and, always on our mind, the Carrillo Adobe, oldest of them all. But not a lot is said about what's left of the Fountain Grove Winery .... More at Press Democrat.com

THE EMPIRE BUILDING AND THE CLOCK TOWER

Next time you're walking in downtown Santa Rosa, take an eyeful of the "Empire Building," and notice that something's wrong. The building itself is quite 20th century - but the clock tower harks back to America in the years after the Civil War. What were they thinking? Slapping an old-fashioned clock tower on an elegant new building does not fine architecture make. Now the most well-recognized structure downtown, it was originally the Santa Rosa Bank Building, built at the same location of the bank destroyed by the Great Earthquake of 1906. Read more at  I See by the Papers...

St. Rose Church Building through the years

The Catholic church is looking to restore and retrofit the Stone building on B street.  Take a look at it through the years.

St Rose Church Building

St Rose Church Building Between 1910 and 1966
1910-1919
1910-1919
1928
1928
1920-1929
1920-1929
1928
1928
1930-1939
1930-1939
1940-1949
1940-1949
1941
1941
1944
1944
1966
1966
    Press Democrat Story  

Healdsburg's Marshall Mansion Restoration

Healdsburg's Marshall Mansion

Bravo! to Phillip Engel and Mark Goff!!! Thank you for preserving Sonoma County's heritage. Press Democrat Story

Dan Peterson dies at 76

  Santa Rosa's classic, Roman-columned 1910 post office faced demolition 40 years ago when architect Dan Peterson advocated saving it by picking it up and sliding it out of the path of urban renewal. Some locals mocked the notion of moving the two-story, 1,700-ton stone edifice. Conservationist Peterson beamed in 1979 as it completed its snail-paced, two-block journey — and some spectators sported T-shirts that exclaimed, “They said it couldn't be done!”...... More
By CHRIS SMITH THE PRESS DEMOCRAT October 8, 2013
Related: Post office documentation and drawings
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